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Auto Body Technician Apprenticeship (ABA) (Revised 2017)

© Alberta Education, Canada 
 Table of Contents   Program of Studies

There are 2 Teacher Resources related to the entire Program of Studies
Program Philosophy & Rationale
Vision

To engage students in learning opportunities through which they discover their interests in practical and purposeful ways.

Introduction

Canadian society experiences continuous social, cultural and economic change, and today’s students must be confident in their ability to respond to change and successfully meet the challenges they face. Whether students enter the work force or continue their education after senior high school, they will be challenged by increased independence and responsibility as they pursue choices and opportunities in their life paths.

Current trends indicate that the majority of new jobs today and in the future will require some form of post-secondary education and that the completion of senior high school will no longer be sufficient. Alberta faces a range of emerging challenges, including the changing nature of work and career paths; the requirement of greater skills and knowledge in many occupations; the introduction of new technologies; changing patterns of education and training; the globalization of the marketplace; labour shortages; and the need for highly skilled, educated and innovative people.

The Career and Technology Studies (CTS) program has been revised and refocused in cooperation with teachers, business and industry representatives, and post-secondary educators to address the emerging trends, challenges and opportunities of today and tomorrow. The result is:

  • a focused program of studies based on credible occupational areas
  • opportunities for all students to explore their abilities, interests and passions and to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes through exploratory courses or a pathways model
  • printed and digital resources that support learning experiences in career fields
  • access to CTS programming through classroom, online, off-campus and other combined approaches to instruction.
Philosophy

The CTS program is designed to develop skills that senior high school students can apply in their daily lives when preparing for entry into the workplace or for further learning opportunities. Through the CTS program, students are provided with opportunities to personalize their learning, identify and explore their interests, manage transitions and build partnerships while developing basic competencies, that is, the attitudes and behaviours that people need to participate and progress in today’s dynamic world of work.

Today’s world of work demands that individuals are able to navigate and build their own career paths while adapting to continual change. This expectation requires a shift in the language used to define "career" as well as a shift in the delivery of career development. Careers are not defined as jobs and occupations, but rather as whole packages of expressed roles, knowledge, choices, passions and experiences. Careers are created by individuals who act upon passions, interests, abilities and other internal factors and combine them with external options and circumstances. Each person’s career path is unique, even though individuals may share common credentials, occupations, work roles, or jobs and experiences.

Ultimately, it is the student who will make his or her own links between school, career development and post-secondary options. Career development requires students to be active in their learning and to develop enthusiasm for lifelong learning that carries them beyond learning in school.

Career development also requires acknowledgement that today’s world is a technological world. Technology affects the environment, one’s standard of living and one’s quality of life. People use technology in the workplace, at home, at school and in sporting and leisure activities. Technology is used to extend possibilities, allowing individuals to intervene in the world through the development of products, systems and environments. Technology is continually changing. It is influenced by and, in turn, influences the cultural, ethical, environmental, political and economic factors of the day, both local and global.

Students in CTS can develop competence and confidence in understanding and using existing technologies and in creating solutions to technological problems. Taking CTS courses contributes to the intellectual and practical development of students, as individuals and as informed members of a technological society.

The CTS program strives to address career development in a way that emphasizes personalized learning, relevance, transitions and partnerships. It does so by:

  • providing opportunities for all students to explore their abilities, interests and passions and to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes so they can be fulfilled, productive citizens
  • providing opportunities for all students to develop the foundations to manage transitions within their learning environment and when moving into further education, training and/or the workplace
  • influencing the growth of a career development culture in schools and communities
  • facilitating the integration and coordination of career development across Kindergarten to Grade 12, advanced education, workplaces and the community.

Students’ interests might lie in working with their hands, working with other people, working in an environment of constantly changing ideas, or working in a career that follows carefully established patterns. All of these areas include a variety of occupations that require more or less education.1

1. "From the Mouths of Middle-Schoolers: Important Changes for High School and College." Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 89, No. 03 (November 2007): 189–193. William J. Bushaw. Reprinted with permission of PDK International.

Rationale

CTS courses enable students to make reasoned and effective career decisions and target efforts to meet their goals. Students will have opportunities to expand their knowledge about careers, occupations and job opportunities, as well as the education and/or training requirements involved. Competencies achieved by mastering CTS course outcomes will allow students to make relevant connections with work and/or post-secondary training.

CTS also enables students to develop the confidence they need as they move into adult roles by allowing them to assume increased responsibility for their learning; cultivate their individual talents, interests and abilities; and define and act on their goals. The CTS pathways model includes the following benefits for students, educators and employers.

Benefits for Students

Through the pathways model, students experience:

  • relevant and engaged learning
  • freedom in exploring multiple pathways
  • personally meaningful pathways leading to specialized skills
  • engagement in their interests or passions
  • opportunities to achieve post-secondary credentials while still in senior high school
  • easier transitions from senior high school to post-secondary education or the work force.

Benefits for Educators

Through the pathways model, educators experience:

  • more focused organization of CTS courses
  • a focused and engaged learner
  • greater opportunity for community support.

Benefits for Employers

Through the pathways model, employers experience:

  • employees with specialized skills or post-secondary or industry credentials
  • motivated and engaged employees.
Program Organization
Overview

The CTS Compass above can assist students as they explore and discover their interests and passions.

As students move into the Middle Years, they begin to identify with one or more interest areas: business, communication, resources, technology and/or human service. As students enter senior high school and the CTS program, they begin to identify the occupational cluster or clusters that suit their interests and abilities. As students become more focused, they examine options for occupations based on the National Occupational Classification. With a career goal in mind, students can develop a pathway that leads them directly to an occupation or to post-secondary education.

The organization of the CTS program into clusters provides students, teachers and administrators with opportunities to create exploratory programs, in which students can sample courses of interest, or to use or create focused pathways that lead to specialized skills, external credentials or further education. Career guidance professionals may use this organizational structure to assist students in assessing their educational goals, interests, abilities and skills and to facilitate good matches to the many pathway options possible in the CTS clusters.

CTS Courses

CTS courses are competency-based instructional units defined by learning outcomes that identify what a student is expected to know and be able to do. Courses include outcomes with practical applications, and each course represents approximately 25 hours of access to instruction. CTS courses are weighted at 1 credit each and are divided into three levels of achievement: introductory, intermediate and advanced. Some courses require one or more prerequisites, which are essential for maintaining safety standards, appropriate instructional sequence and articulation with post-secondary programs. CTS courses can be selected by students in an exploratory fashion, or they can be taken as part of an intentional pathway.

For each course, the program of studies lists a general description, the general and specific outcomes, prerequisites and course parameters (e.g., recommendations regarding instructional qualifications, facilities and equipment). The general outcomes are presented in boldface, and the specific outcomes follow immediately in lightface.

Levels of Achievement

Courses are organized into three levels of achievement: introductory, intermediate and advanced. Levels of achievement are not indicators of grade levels. As students progress through the levels, they will be expected to meet higher standards and to demonstrate an increased degree of competence in both the general and specific outcomes.

Introductory level courses help students build daily living skills and form the basis for further learning. Introductory courses prepare students for further experiences in the cluster, pathway or occupational area.

Intermediate level courses build on the competencies developed at the introductory level. They provide a broader perspective, helping students recognize the wide range of related career opportunities available within the cluster.

Advanced level courses refine expertise and help prepare students for entry into the workplace or a related post-secondary program defined within the cluster.

CTS Clusters

A cluster is a group of CTS courses that represents occupations and broad industry commonalities. Clusters in CTS are aligned with the National Occupational Classification (NOC) and function as an organizing tool for the CTS program. (For more information on the NOC, visit the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Web site at http://www5.hrsdc.gc.ca/NOC/).

The CTS program includes five clusters: Business, Administration, Finance & Information Technology (BIT); Health, Recreation & Human Services (HRH); Media, Design & Communication Arts (MDC); Natural Resources (NAT); and Trades, Manufacturing & Transportation (TMT).

Clusters connect learning outcomes specific to the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for related occupational areas. Clusters:

  • help students choose curriculum and occupational fields for which they have interest and aptitude
  • provide a context for selecting courses specific to a pathway
  • help connect students with exploratory courses of study, allowing students to gain general, transferable skills
  • help students develop specialized skills and knowledge through pathways
  • focus teaching and learning by relating similar knowledge, linking shared skills, guiding career exploration, allowing students to make informed career choices, associating common interests and linking education with relevant real-world experiential activities.

The Five Clusters

Business, Administration, Finance & Information Technology (BIT)
The focus of the BIT cluster is for students to develop and apply important knowledge, skills and attitudes so they can implement efficient systems and strategies of management and marketing and use electronic technologies to collect, structure, manipulate, retrieve and communicate information within individual, family, workplace, community and global contexts.

Health, Recreation & Human Services (HRH)
The focus of the HRH cluster is for students to develop and apply important knowledge, skills and attitudes so they can provide care and services for individuals and groups in a variety of industries, such as health care, recreation, cosmetology, the food industry and the legal system.

Media, Design & Communication Arts (MDC)
The focus of the MDC cluster is for students to develop and apply important knowledge, skills and attitudes so they can provide well designed and aesthetically effective communication solutions.

Natural Resources (NAT)
The focus of the NAT cluster is for students to develop and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes to work individually and collectively, as private citizens and as members of the work force, toward the conservation and responsible use of energy and natural resources.

Trades, Manufacturing & Transportation (TMT)
The focus of the TMT cluster is for students to develop and apply important knowledge, skills and attitudes relative to the manufacture and assembly of products from individual components and the processing of raw materials into products.

CTS Pathways

Many schools in North America and around the world are now providing students with opportunities to explore their career path through a variety of courses that are organized around common occupational areas. These pathways allow students to follow their natural skills, aptitudes and interests in an organized and progressive way as they work toward goals that may include university, college, apprenticeship training or moving directly into the work force.

Pathways are flexible and they permit students to:

  • explore an occupation or an interest area
  • gain an occupational or a specialized skill set required in the workplace
  • apply relevant learning from academic courses to real-life situations
  • focus their senior high school course plans into a career path.

The pathways model of CTS facilitates making connections between CTS courses and other subjects. Within each CTS cluster, the potential for several pathways exists. These pathways will address the specific skills and knowledge necessary to pursue a full range of career opportunities, including technical and professional career specialties. All pathways, with the exception of credentialed pathways, can be built and modified by students or teachers.

Sample Pathway (BIT): Business Basics

Note: A variety of sample pathways are provided in the Guide to Career and Technology Studies.

Pathways should be designed to prepare students to transition successfully from senior high school to post-secondary education or to employment in an occupational area. Links to post-secondary educational institutions, employers, industry groups and other stakeholders can be included within a pathway.

There are two possible kinds of pathways in the CTS program:

  • 1. Specialized skill pathways provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes for employment or further education. These pathways can be customized to meet student, school or community program needs. Courses within such a pathway will prepare students for specific community or job-site skills.

  • 2. Credentialed pathways provide students with post-secondary and/or business and industry credentials or articulation. For students to obtain the desired credential or articulation, all specified course outcomes within the pathway must be met.
Meeting the Diverse Needs of Alberta's Students

Alberta schools include students from a rich variety of backgrounds. These students have a wide range of abilities and needs. Like all school programs, the CTS program has been developed with this diversity in mind. Teachers and instructors should be aware of the individual needs of their students and adapt their instruction and programming accordingly.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) Students

FNMI students in northern and western Canada come from diverse geographic areas with varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Teachers and instructors need to understand the diversity of these students’ cultures and experiences. They also need to understand that there are values and cultural traditions shared amongst many Aboriginal Canadians, including the importance of family and the role of Elders in guiding and supporting young people.

FNMI students often have a holistic view of learning—they look for connections through experiential learning. Such connections can be made within the real-world, experiential CTS program. Traditionally, in FNMI cultures, little emphasis was placed upon the written word. Still today, oral communication and practical applications and experiences are important to student learning and understanding. A variety of teaching and assessment strategies can help build upon the diverse knowledge, cultures, communication styles, skills, attitudes, experiences and learning styles of FNMI students.

English as a Second Language or French as a Second Language Students

Immigrants to Alberta come from many different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Many of these new arrivals become students in Alberta schools, yet their knowledge of English or French may be minimal. Some students who have lived in Canada their entire lives may also be learning to speak English or French as a second (or third) language. The variety of teaching and assessment strategies that can be used in the CTS program may help build upon the diverse knowledge, cultures, communication styles, skills, attitudes, experiences and learning styles of these students.

Students Who Have an Individualized Program Plan (IPP)

Students who have been identified as having special education needs will have an Individualized Program Plan (IPP), which should be used to guide teachers’ planning and instruction. The needs of these students vary greatly from one individual to the next and may range from physical adaptations to the environment or equipment, to arranging for special testing accommodations.

Auto Body Technician Apprenticeship (ABA)
ABA3401: Workplace Skills 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3900: Apprenticeship Safety

Description: Students develop workplace coaching, estimating and communication skills relevant to the auto body technician trade.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Hand and Power Tools (Prepper) 100102a; Batteries 100102b; Trim Removal and Installation 100102c

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. display coaching skills
    • 1.1 describe coaching skills used for training apprentices

  • 2. describe estimates and repair orders and develop a work plan
    • 2.1 describe the requirements of an estimate
    • 2.2 explain estimates and repair orders, including:
      • 2.2.1 estimates as selling tools
      • 2.2.2 estimates as negotiating tools
      • 2.2.3 estimate terms and abbreviations
      • 2.2.4 all sections of a repair order
    • 2.3 explain the use of original equipment manufacturer (OEM) service information
    • 2.4 explain the use of aftermarket service information
    • 2.5 develop a work plan

  • 3. communicate with all parties involved
    • 3.1 practice professional verbal and nonverbal communication between trade related contacts
    • 3.2 interpret standard operating procedures

  • 4. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 4.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 4.1.1 communicate
      • 4.1.2 manage information
      • 4.1.3 use numbers
      • 4.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 4.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 4.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 4.2.2 be responsible
      • 4.2.3 be adaptable
      • 4.2.4 learn continuously
      • 4.2.5 work safely
    • 4.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 4.3.1 work with others
      • 4.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 5. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 5.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 5.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3402: Batteries, Trim & Tools 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3401: Workplace Skills

Description: Students develop an understanding of hand and power tools, battery charging and boosting and vehicle detailing.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Hand and Power Tools (Prepper) 100102a; Batteries 100102b; Trim Removal and Installation 100102c

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. use auto body tools and equipment
    • 1.1 identify hand tools, including:
      • 1.1.1 wrenches
      • 1.1.2 sockets, extensions and universal joints
      • 1.1.3 pliers
      • 1.1.4 screwdrivers
      • 1.1.5 hammers
      • 1.1.6 body spoons, picks and pry bars
      • 1.1.7 pop riveters
      • 1.1.8 cutting tools
      • 1.1.9 trim removal tools
      • 1.1.10 sanding tools
      • 1.1.11 measuring tools
      • 1.1.12 pullers and jacks
      • 1.1.13 torque wrenches
    • 1.2 identify power tools, including:
      • 1.2.1 electric tools
      • 1.2.2 pneumatic tools
      • 1.2.3 hydraulic tools
    • 1.3 identify equipment

  • 2. service batteries
    • 2.1 identify battery types
    • 2.2 describe battery function, including:
      • 2.2.1 purpose
      • 2.2.2 construction
      • 2.2.3 operation
      • 2.2.4 safety
    • 2.3 describe battery charging, including:
      • 2.3.1 charging procedures
      • 2.3.2 types of chargers
    • 2.4 describe battery boosting, including:
      • 2.4.1 preparation
      • 2.4.2 connections and procedure
      • 2.4.3 disconnecting

  • 3. perform final detail
    • 3.1 describe detailing procedures
    • 3.2 describe types of decals and striping
    • 3.3 describe removal of decals and striping
    • 3.4 describe installation of decals and striping
    • 3.5 clean interior of vehicle
    • 3.6 clean exterior of vehicle

  • 4. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 4.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 4.1.1 communicate
      • 4.1.2 manage information
      • 4.1.3 use numbers
      • 4.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 4.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 4.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 4.2.2 be responsible
      • 4.2.3 be adaptable
      • 4.2.4 learn continuously
      • 4.2.5 work safely
    • 4.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 4.3.1 work with others
      • 4.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 5. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 5.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 5.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3405: Removal & Installation 1 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3402: Tools, Batteries & Detailing

Description: Students develop an understanding of non-structural body components for removal and installation.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Component Assembly Removal and Installation 100102d

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. identify and describe non-structural components
    • 1.1 identify types of body components
    • 1.2 identify the purpose of trim, including:
      • 1.2.1 protection
      • 1.2.2 appearance
      • 1.2.3 function
    • 1.3 identify restraint systems, including:
      • 1.3.1 passive restraint system codes; e.g., Supplemental Restraint System (SRS), Supplemental Inflatable Restraint (SIR), Air Cushion Restraint System (ACRS)
      • 1.3.2 supplemental restraint components; e.g., controllers, sensors, wiring harness, air bag module
      • 1.3.3 safety concerns of restraint systems
    • 1.4 describe methods of fastening; e.g., adhesives, bolts, screws, rivets, clips, speed nuts
    • 1.5 assess components for hidden damage
    • 1.6 describe component storage procedures

  • 2. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 2.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 2.1.1 communicate
      • 2.1.2 manage information
      • 2.1.3 use numbers
      • 2.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 2.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 2.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 2.2.2 be responsible
      • 2.2.3 be adaptable
      • 2.2.4 learn continuously
      • 2.2.5 work safely
    • 2.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 2.3.1 work with others
      • 2.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 3. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 3.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 3.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3406: Removal & Installation 2 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3402: Tools, Batteries & Detailing

Description: Students demonstrate procedures for the removal and installation of non-structural body components.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Component Assembly Removal and Installation 100102d

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. install non-structural body components
    • 1.1 remove bolt on components, considering:
      • 1.1.1 removal procedures
      • 1.1.2 attachment methods
      • 1.1.3 safety
    • 1.2 describe body panel alignment of bolt on components, including:
      • 1.2.1 standard uniform fit
      • 1.2.2 flush/shingle effect
      • 1.2.3 manufacturer tolerances
    • 1.3 describe a headlight alignment procedure
    • 1.4 describe a leak test procedure
    • 1.5 install bolt on components

  • 2. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 2.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 2.1.1 communicate
      • 2.1.2 manage information
      • 2.1.3 use numbers
      • 2.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 2.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 2.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 2.2.2 be responsible
      • 2.2.3 be adaptable
      • 2.2.4 learn continuously
      • 2.2.5 work safely
    • 2.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 2.3.1 work with others
      • 2.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 3. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 3.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 3.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3410: Substrates 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship, Section One

Prerequisite: ABA3406: Removal & Installation 2

Description: Students identify and develop an understanding of types of paint finishes.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Substrate Identification 100103a

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. identify types of paint finishes
    • 1.1 identify substrates, including:
      • 1.1.1 coated and non-coated steel
      • 1.1.2 aluminum
      • 1.1.3 hybrid plastics
      • 1.1.4 fibre-reinforced plastics (FRP)
    • 1.2 identify condition of substrate, including:
      • 1.2.1 chalking
      • 1.2.2 peeling
      • 1.2.3 cracking
      • 1.2.4 microchecking
      • 1.2.5 blistering
      • 1.2.6 rusting
      • 1.2.7 adhesion
    • 1.3 describe substrate preparation methods, including:
      • 1.3.1 cleaning of repair area
      • 1.3.2 locating and noting damage
      • 1.3.3 prepping area for filler
      • 1.3.4 sanding
      • 1.3.5 cleaning and masking
      • 1.3.6 application of undercoat
      • 1.3.7 block sanding primed area
      • 1.3.8 cleaning and masking for topcoats

  • 2. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 2.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 2.1.1 communicate
      • 2.1.2 manage information
      • 2.1.3 use numbers
      • 2.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 2.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 2.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 2.2.2 be responsible
      • 2.2.3 be adaptable
      • 2.2.4 learn continuously
      • 2.2.5 work safely
    • 2.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 2.3.1 work with others
      • 2.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 3. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 3.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 3.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3415: Fillers 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3410: Substrates

Description: Students use fillers to repair minor imperfections.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Application of Fillers 100103b

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. apply fillers
    • 1.1 describe surface preparation for filler, including:
      • 1.1.1 metal preparation
      • 1.1.2 aluminum preparation
      • 1.1.3 composite preparation
      • 1.1.4 sheet metal contractor preparation
    • 1.2 apply fillers, demonstrating:
      • 1.2.1 surface preparation
      • 1.2.2 mixing
      • 1.2.3 application
    • 1.3 perform sanding of fillers, demonstrating:
      • 1.3.1 sanding block selection
      • 1.3.2 grit selection
      • 1.3.3 stage-sanding process dependent upon filler type
      • 1.3.4 levelling techniques
      • 1.3.5 finish sanding

  • 2. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 2.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 2.1.1 communicate
      • 2.1.2 manage information
      • 2.1.3 use numbers
      • 2.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 2.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 2.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 2.2.2 be responsible
      • 2.2.3 be adaptable
      • 2.2.4 learn continuously
      • 2.2.5 work safely
    • 2.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 2.3.1 work with others
      • 2.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 3. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 3.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 3.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3420: Surface Preparation 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3415: Fillers

Description: Students prepare surfaces and perform sanding appropriate for undercoats and topcoats.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Surface Preparation and Stripping 100103c

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. prepare surface for coatings
    • 1.1 describe undercoat preparation methods, including:
      • 1.1.1 composite sanding
      • 1.1.2 block sanding
      • 1.1.3 hand sanding; e.g., back sanding, scuff sanding, folding paper
    • 1.2 perform sanding for undercoats, considering:
      • 1.2.1 scratch patterns; e.g., circular, elliptical, straight line
      • 1.2.2 sanding methods; e.g., dual action, featheredging, interface pad, circular
    • 1.3 describe topcoat preparation methods, including:
      • 1.3.1 setup
      • 1.3.2 sanding
      • 1.3.3 cleaning
      • 1.3.4 sanding-throughs
      • 1.3.5 over and under sanding
      • 1.3.6 finger sanding
      • 1.3.7 final inspection
    • 1.4 perform sanding for topcoats, including:
      • 1.4.1 preparing a substrate for topcoat; e.g., guide coats, sanding paste, blending
      • 1.4.2 final cleaning; e.g., final wash, blowing, tacking

  • 2. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 2.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 2.1.1 communicate
      • 2.1.2 manage information
      • 2.1.3 use numbers
      • 2.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 2.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 2.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 2.2.2 be responsible
      • 2.2.3 be adaptable
      • 2.2.4 learn continuously
      • 2.2.5 work safely
    • 2.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 2.3.1 work with others
      • 2.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 3. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 3.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 3.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3425: Masking 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3420: Surface Preparation

Description: Students develop an understanding of masking for an undercoat and topcoat application.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Masking 100103d

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. mask a vehicle
    • 1.1 describe methods and materials used for masking, including:
      • 1.1.1 crepe paper
      • 1.1.2 polypropylene tape
      • 1.1.3 vinyl tape
      • 1.1.4 duct tape
      • 1.1.5 coated and non-coated masking paper
      • 1.1.6 plastic sheeting
      • 1.1.7 overspray masking liquid
      • 1.1.8 hard-edge trim masking tape
      • 1.1.9 trim lifting cord
      • 1.1.10 wheel covers
    • 1.2 mask a repair area for an undercoat application
    • 1.3 mask a repair area for a topcoat application, including:
      • 1.3.1 general masking
      • 1.3.2 masking tape application
      • 1.3.3 back masking
      • 1.3.4 reverse masking
      • 1.3.5 masking removal methods

  • 2. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 2.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 2.1.1 communicate
      • 2.1.2 manage information
      • 2.1.3 use numbers
      • 2.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 2.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 2.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 2.2.2 be responsible
      • 2.2.3 be adaptable
      • 2.2.4 learn continuously
      • 2.2.5 work safely
    • 2.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 2.3.1 work with others
      • 2.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 3. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 3.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 3.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3430: Undercoating 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: ABA3425: Masking

Description: Students develop an understanding of undercoat preparation and application.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with journeyperson certification as an auto body technician or an individual with certification in the auto body prepper, auto body repairer, or auto body refinisher trades.

ILM Resources: Application of Undercoats 100103e

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. apply undercoats
    • 1.1 describe undercoats; e.g., primers, sealers, corrosion protection
    • 1.2 prepare undercoat materials, including:
      • 1.2.1 metal etching primer (wash primer)
      • 1.2.2 epoxy primers
      • 1.2.3 primer surfacer
      • 1.2.4 hardener additives
      • 1.2.5 solvents
      • 1.2.6 accelerators
      • 1.2.7 flex additives
      • 1.2.8 adhesion promoter
    • 1.3 perform operating procedures for refinishing equipment, including:
      • 1.3.1 suction, siphon feed and gravity feed primer guns
      • 1.3.2 high-volume low-pressure (HVLP) and conventional spray guns
      • 1.3.3 flood tests
      • 1.3.4 spray pattern tests
    • 1.4 perform maintenance procedures for refinishing equipment, including:
      • 1.4.1 hand-cleaning spray guns
      • 1.4.2 using a spray gun washer
    • 1.5 apply undercoats, considering:
      • 1.5.1 perpendicular to the surface
      • 1.5.2 perpendicular to the line of travel
      • 1.5.3 gun arcing
      • 1.5.4 triggering techniques
      • 1.5.5 feathering
      • 1.5.6 overlap
      • 1.5.7 gun heeling
      • 1.5.8 gun direction

  • 2. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 2.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 2.1.1 communicate
      • 2.1.2 manage information
      • 2.1.3 use numbers
      • 2.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 2.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 2.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 2.2.2 be responsible
      • 2.2.3 be adaptable
      • 2.2.4 learn continuously
      • 2.2.5 work safely
    • 2.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 2.3.1 work with others
      • 2.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 3. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 3.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 3.2 identify steps to achieve goals

ABA3435: ABA Practicum A

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: None

Description: Students, on the work site, continue to develop and refine those competencies developed in related Career and Technology Studies (CTS) occupational areas, previous practicums and other experiences.

Parameters: This course should be accessed only by students continuing to work toward attaining a recognized credential offered by an agency external to the school. Practicum courses extend the competencies developed in related CTS occupational areas. The practicum courses may not be delivered as stand-alone courses and may not be combined with core courses. This course may not be used in conjunction with Registered Apprenticeship Program courses. This practicum course may be delivered on- or off-campus. Instruction must be delivered by a qualified teacher with journeyperson certification or an experienced professional with journeyperson certification, who is under the supervision of the qualified teacher; both must be authorized to supervise trainees for the external credential.

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. perform assigned tasks and responsibilities efficiently and effectively, as required by the agency granting credentials
    • 1.1 identify regulations and regulatory bodies related to the credential
    • 1.2 describe personal roles and responsibilities, including:
      • 1.2.1 key responsibilities
      • 1.2.2 support functions/responsibilities
      • 1.2.3 code of ethics
    • 1.3 describe personal work responsibilities and categorize them as:
      • 1.3.1 routine tasks; e.g., daily, weekly, monthly, yearly
      • 1.3.2 non-routine tasks; e.g., emergencies
      • 1.3.3 tasks requiring personal judgement
      • 1.3.4 tasks requiring approval of a supervisor

  • 2. analyze personal performance in relation to established standards
    • 2.1 evaluate application of competencies developed in related CTS courses
    • 2.2 evaluate standards of performance in terms of:
      • 2.2.1 quality of work
      • 2.2.2 quantity of work
    • 2.3 evaluate adherence to workplace policies and procedures related to health and safety
    • 2.4 evaluate the work environment in terms of:
      • 2.4.1 location
      • 2.4.2 floor plan of work area
      • 2.4.3 analysis of work flow patterns
    • 2.5 evaluate a professional in a related occupation in terms of:
      • 2.5.1 training and certification
      • 2.5.2 interpersonal skills
      • 2.5.3 technical skills
      • 2.5.4 professional ethics

  • 3. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 3.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 3.1.1 communicate
      • 3.1.2 manage information
      • 3.1.3 use numbers
      • 3.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 3.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 3.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 3.2.2 be responsible
      • 3.2.3 be adaptable
      • 3.2.4 learn continuously
      • 3.2.5 work safely
    • 3.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 3.3.1 work with others
      • 3.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

ABA3440: ABA Practicum B

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: None

Description: Students, on the work site, continue to develop and refine those competencies developed in related Career and Technology Studies (CTS) occupational areas, previous practicums and other experiences.

Parameters: This course should be accessed only by students continuing to work toward attaining a recognized credential offered by an agency external to the school. Practicum courses extend the competencies developed in related CTS occupational areas. The practicum courses may not be delivered as stand-alone courses and may not be combined with core courses. This course may not be used in conjunction with Registered Apprenticeship Program courses. This practicum course may be delivered on- or off-campus. Instruction must be delivered by a qualified teacher with journeyperson certification or an experienced professional with journeyperson certification, who is under the supervision of the qualified teacher; both must be authorized to supervise trainees for the external credential.

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. perform assigned tasks and responsibilities efficiently and effectively, as required by the agency granting credentials
    • 1.1 identify regulations and regulatory bodies related to the credential
    • 1.2 describe personal roles and responsibilities, including:
      • 1.2.1 key responsibilities
      • 1.2.2 support functions/responsibilities
      • 1.2.3 code of ethics
    • 1.3 describe personal work responsibilities and categorize them as:
      • 1.3.1 routine tasks; e.g., daily, weekly, monthly, yearly
      • 1.3.2 non-routine tasks; e.g., emergencies
      • 1.3.3 tasks requiring personal judgement
      • 1.3.4 tasks requiring approval of a supervisor

  • 2. analyze personal performance in relation to established standards
    • 2.1 evaluate application of competencies developed in related CTS courses
    • 2.2 evaluate standards of performance in terms of:
      • 2.2.1 quality of work
      • 2.2.2 quantity of work
    • 2.3 evaluate adherence to workplace policies and procedures related to health and safety
    • 2.4 evaluate the work environment in terms of:
      • 2.4.1 location
      • 2.4.2 floor plan of work area
      • 2.4.3 analysis of work flow patterns
    • 2.5 evaluate a professional in a related occupation in terms of:
      • 2.5.1 training and certification
      • 2.5.2 interpersonal skills
      • 2.5.3 technical skills
      • 2.5.4 professional ethics

  • 3. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 3.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 3.1.1 communicate
      • 3.1.2 manage information
      • 3.1.3 use numbers
      • 3.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 3.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 3.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 3.2.2 be responsible
      • 3.2.3 be adaptable
      • 3.2.4 learn continuously
      • 3.2.5 work safely
    • 3.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 3.3.1 work with others
      • 3.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

ABA3445: ABA Practicum C

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: None

Description: Students, on the work site, continue to develop and refine those competencies developed in related Career and Technology Studies (CTS) occupational areas, previous practicums and other experiences.

Parameters: This course should be accessed only by students continuing to work toward attaining a recognized credential offered by an agency external to the school. Practicum courses extend the competencies developed in related CTS occupational areas. The practicum courses may not be delivered as stand-alone courses and may not be combined with core courses. This course may not be used in conjunction with Registered Apprenticeship Program courses. This practicum course may be delivered on- or off-campus. Instruction must be delivered by a qualified teacher with journeyperson certification or an experienced professional with journeyperson certification, who is under the supervision of the qualified teacher; both must be authorized to supervise trainees for the external credential.

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. perform assigned tasks and responsibilities efficiently and effectively, as required by the agency granting credentials
    • 1.1 identify regulations and regulatory bodies related to the credential
    • 1.2 describe personal roles and responsibilities, including:
      • 1.2.1 key responsibilities
      • 1.2.2 support functions/responsibilities
      • 1.2.3 code of ethics
    • 1.3 describe personal work responsibilities and categorize them as:
      • 1.3.1 routine tasks; e.g., daily, weekly, monthly, yearly
      • 1.3.2 non-routine tasks; e.g., emergencies
      • 1.3.3 tasks requiring personal judgement
      • 1.3.4 tasks requiring approval of a supervisor

  • 2. analyze personal performance in relation to established standards
    • 2.1 evaluate application of competencies developed in related CTS courses
    • 2.2 evaluate standards of performance in terms of:
      • 2.2.1 quality of work
      • 2.2.2 quantity of work
    • 2.3 evaluate adherence to workplace policies and procedures related to health and safety
    • 2.4 evaluate the work environment in terms of:
      • 2.4.1 location
      • 2.4.2 floor plan of work area
      • 2.4.3 analysis of work flow patterns
    • 2.5 evaluate a professional in a related occupation in terms of:
      • 2.5.1 training and certification
      • 2.5.2 interpersonal skills
      • 2.5.3 technical skills
      • 2.5.4 professional ethics

  • 3. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 3.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 3.1.1 communicate
      • 3.1.2 manage information
      • 3.1.3 use numbers
      • 3.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 3.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 3.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 3.2.2 be responsible
      • 3.2.3 be adaptable
      • 3.2.4 learn continuously
      • 3.2.5 work safely
    • 3.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 3.3.1 work with others
      • 3.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

ABA3450: ABA Practicum D

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: None

Description: Students, on the work site, continue to develop and refine those competencies developed in related Career and Technology Studies (CTS) occupational areas, previous practicums and other experiences.

Parameters: This course should be accessed only by students continuing to work toward attaining a recognized credential offered by an agency external to the school. Practicum courses extend the competencies developed in related CTS occupational areas. The practicum courses may not be delivered as stand-alone courses and may not be combined with core courses. This course may not be used in conjunction with Registered Apprenticeship Program courses. This practicum course may be delivered on- or off-campus. Instruction must be delivered by a qualified teacher with journeyperson certification or an experienced professional with journeyperson certification, who is under the supervision of the qualified teacher; both must be authorized to supervise trainees for the external credential.

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. perform assigned tasks and responsibilities efficiently and effectively, as required by the agency granting credentials
    • 1.1 identify regulations and regulatory bodies related to the credential
    • 1.2 describe personal roles and responsibilities, including:
      • 1.2.1 key responsibilities
      • 1.2.2 support functions/responsibilities
      • 1.2.3 code of ethics
    • 1.3 describe personal work responsibilities and categorize them as:
      • 1.3.1 routine tasks; e.g., daily, weekly, monthly, yearly
      • 1.3.2 non-routine tasks; e.g., emergencies
      • 1.3.3 tasks requiring personal judgement
      • 1.3.4 tasks requiring approval of a supervisor

  • 2. analyze personal performance in relation to established standards
    • 2.1 evaluate application of competencies developed in related CTS courses
    • 2.2 evaluate standards of performance in terms of:
      • 2.2.1 quality of work
      • 2.2.2 quantity of work
    • 2.3 evaluate adherence to workplace policies and procedures related to health and safety
    • 2.4 evaluate the work environment in terms of:
      • 2.4.1 location
      • 2.4.2 floor plan of work area
      • 2.4.3 analysis of work flow patterns
    • 2.5 evaluate a professional in a related occupation in terms of:
      • 2.5.1 training and certification
      • 2.5.2 interpersonal skills
      • 2.5.3 technical skills
      • 2.5.4 professional ethics

  • 3. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 3.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 3.1.1 communicate
      • 3.1.2 manage information
      • 3.1.3 use numbers
      • 3.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 3.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 3.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 3.2.2 be responsible
      • 3.2.3 be adaptable
      • 3.2.4 learn continuously
      • 3.2.5 work safely
    • 3.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 3.3.1 work with others
      • 3.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

ABA3900: Apprenticeship Safety 

Level: First Period Apprenticeship

Prerequisite: None

Description: Students develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the practice of workshop health and safety, communication and career planning.

Parameters: Access to a materials work centre and to instruction from an individual with specialized training in occupational health and safety (and understanding of the auto body industry) and/or an auto body technician.

ILM Resources: Safety Legislation, Regulations and Industry Policy in the Trades 650101a; Climbing, Lifting, Rigging and Hoisting 650101b; Hazardous Materials and Fire Protection 650101c; Communication 090101d; Advisory Network 100101c; Regulations that Affect the Trade 100101d

Note: This course may promote discussions around sensitive topics (e.g., injury and death) in the context of student safety with respect to workplace hazards.

Outcomes: The student will:

  • 1. apply legislation, regulations and practices intended to ensure a safe workplace in the auto body technician apprenticeship trade
    • 1.1 demonstrate the application of the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act, Regulation and Code, as well as the changes from Bill C-45
    • 1.2 explain the core requirements applicable to all industries, including:
      • 1.2.1 engineering controls
      • 1.2.2 administrative controls
      • 1.2.3 personal protective equipment (PPE)
    • 1.3 demonstrate an understanding of the 26 parts of the OHS Code requirements applicable to all industries
    • 1.4 demonstrate an understanding of the 12 parts of the OHS Code requirements applicable to specific industries and activities
    • 1.5 demonstrate an understanding of the 11 OHS Code Schedules that the Explanation Guide does not address
    • 1.6 explain the role of the employer and employee in regard to occupational health and safety legislation, considering:
      • 1.6.1 employer responsibilities (OHS Regulation)
      • 1.6.2 employee responsibilities (OHS Regulation)
      • 1.6.3 Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
      • 1.6.4 fire regulations
      • 1.6.5 Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB)
      • 1.6.6 related advisory bodies and agencies; e.g., Occupational Health and Safety Council (OHSC), Work Safe Alberta, Safety Codes Council
    • 1.7 explain industry practices for hazard assessment and control procedures in four main hazard categories, including:
      • 1.7.1 biological
      • 1.7.2 chemical
      • 1.7.3 ergonomic
      • 1.7.4 physical hazards
    • 1.8 identify and describe hazard assessment tools that both employees and employers must use in assessing and controlling work-site hazards, including:
      • 1.8.1 work-site hazard identification and assessment
      • 1.8.2 health and safety plan
      • 1.8.3 joint work-site health and safety committee
      • 1.8.4 emergency response plans
      • 1.8.5 first-aid and incident reports
    • 1.9 identify and describe employer engineering controls that provide the highest level of worker protection, including:
      • 1.9.1 elimination
      • 1.9.2 substitution
      • 1.9.3 redesign
      • 1.9.4 isolation
      • 1.9.5 automation
    • 1.10 identify and describe employer administrative controls that limit hazards to the lowest level possible, including:
      • 1.10.1 safe work practices
      • 1.10.2 job procedures, policies and rules
      • 1.10.3 work/rest schedules to reduce exposure
      • 1.10.4 limiting hours of work
      • 1.10.5 scheduling hazardous work during non-peak times
      • 1.10.6 using optional methods; e.g., wet sanding as opposed to dry sanding or sweeping
    • 1.11 describe the responsibilities of employees and employers to apply emergency procedures, including:
      • 1.11.1 emergency response plans
      • 1.11.2 first aid
    • 1.12 describe positive tradesperson attitudes with respect to the legal responsibilities for all workers, including:
      • 1.12.1 housekeeping
      • 1.12.2 lighting
      • 1.12.3 personal protective equipment (PPE)
      • 1.12.4 emergency procedures
    • 1.13 describe the roles and responsibilities of employers and employees with respect to the selection and use of personal protective equipment (PPE), including:
      • 1.13.1 eye protection; e.g., class 1 (spectacles), class 2 (goggles), class 3 (welding helmets), class 4 (welding hand shields), class 5 (hoods), class 6 (face shields), class 7 (respirator face pieces)
      • 1.13.2 flame resistant clothing
      • 1.13.3 foot protection; e.g., category 1, 2 or 3 footwear requirements
      • 1.13.4 head protection; e.g., class G (general), class E (electrical), class C (conducting)
      • 1.13.5 hearing protection; e.g., earplugs or earmuffs
      • 1.13.6 life jackets and personal flotation devices (PFDs)
      • 1.13.7 limb and body protection
      • 1.13.8 respiratory protective equipment; e.g., particulate filters; chemical cartridges or canisters; airline respirators, hoods, helmets and suits; self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)
      • 1.13.9 a combination of any of the above
      • 1.13.10 maintain required PPE for tasks
      • 1.13.11 use required PPE for tasks

  • 2. use industry standard practices for climbing, lifting, rigging and hoisting in the auto body technician apprenticeship trade
    • 2.1 select, use and maintain specialized PPE and materials for climbing, lifting and loading, including:
      • 2.1.1 full body harness
      • 2.1.2 body belt
      • 2.1.3 ladders
      • 2.1.4 scaffold systems
      • 2.1.5 lifting and moving equipment
      • 2.1.6 PPE for lifting
      • 2.1.7 materials handling equipment; e.g., forklift, four-wheel dolly, chain hoist, overhead crane
    • 2.2 describe manual lifting procedures, including correct body mechanics, considering:
      • 2.2.1 back safety
      • 2.2.2 general procedure for lifting
      • 2.2.3 employer and employee preventive actions to avoid back injuries
    • 2.3 describe rigging hardware and the safe work load associated with:
      • 2.3.1 wire rope slings
      • 2.3.2 synthetic fibre web slings
      • 2.3.3 chain slings
      • 2.3.4 rigging hardware inspection
    • 2.4 select the correct equipment for rigging typical loads, including:
      • 2.4.1 eye bolts
      • 2.4.2 shackles
      • 2.4.3 rings and links
      • 2.4.4 hooks
      • 2.4.5 swivels
      • 2.4.6 spreader bars and equalization beams
      • 2.4.7 blocks
      • 2.4.8 sheaves
      • 2.4.9 turnbuckles
    • 2.5 describe hoisting and load-moving procedures
    • 2.6 explain the most commonly used sling configurations to connect a load to a hook, including:
      • 2.6.1 vertical hitch
      • 2.6.2 bridle hitch
      • 2.6.3 single and double basket hitch
      • 2.6.4 wrap hitch
      • 2.6.5 single and double choker hitch
    • 2.7 demonstrate the standard movement signals a signaler is required to know to signal a crane operator, including:
      • 2.7.1 hoist and lower load
      • 2.7.2 raise and lower boom
      • 2.7.3 swing boom
      • 2.7.4 stop
      • 2.7.5 emergency stop
      • 2.7.6 dog everything

  • 3. apply industry standard safety practices for hazardous materials and fire protection in the auto body technician apprenticeship trade
    • 3.1 describe the roles, responsibilities, features and practices related to the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) program, including:
      • 3.1.1 suppliers’, employers’ and employees’ responsibilities
      • 3.1.2 WHMIS classifications
      • 3.1.3 health effects from exposure to chemicals
    • 3.2 describe the three key elements of WHMIS, including:
      • 3.2.1 worker education
      • 3.2.2 supplier and workplace product labelling
      • 3.2.3 material safety data sheets
    • 3.3 describe handling, storage and transportation procedures when dealing with hazardous material, including:
      • 3.3.1 handling, storing and transporting flammable liquids
      • 3.3.2 handling, storing and transporting compressed gas
      • 3.3.3 storing incompatible materials
    • 3.4 describe safe venting procedures when working with hazardous materials, including:
      • 3.4.1 mechanical general ventilation
      • 3.4.2 local ventilation
      • 3.4.3 portable smoke extractor
      • 3.4.4 working in a confined space
    • 3.5 describe fire hazards, classes, procedures and equipment related to fire protection, including:
      • 3.5.1 elements of a fire
      • 3.5.2 classes of fires
      • 3.5.3 fire extinguisher labels
      • 3.5.4 extinguishing small fires
      • 3.5.5 the PASS method

  • 4. manage an apprenticeship to earn journeyman certification
    • 4.1 describe the contractual responsibilities of the apprentice, employer and Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training (AIT)
    • 4.2 describe the purpose of the apprentice record book
    • 4.3 describe the procedure for changing employers during an active apprenticeship
    • 4.4 describe the purpose of the course outline
    • 4.5 describe the procedure for progressing through an apprenticeship
    • 4.6 describe advancement opportunities in this trade

  • 5. describe the role of the AIT Board and the network of industry committees that represent the trades and occupations in Alberta
    • 5.1 describe Alberta’s apprenticeship and industry training system
    • 5.2 describe the roles and responsibilities of the AIT Board, government and post-secondary institutions
    • 5.3 describe the roles and responsibilities of the Provincial Apprenticeship Committees (PACs), Local Apprenticeship Committees (LACs) and Occupational Committees (OCs)

  • 6. use Red Seal products to challenge and interprovincial examination
    • 6.1 identify Red Seal products used to develop interprovincial examinations
    • 6.2 use Red Seal products to prepare for an interprovincial examination

  • 7. demonstrate safety in an auto body shop
    • 7.1 describe types of personal hazards associated with the work assigned to an auto body technician (electrical tools, rotating machinery, compressed air, jacking and hoisting, exhaust gases, etc.)
    • 7.2 use safety equipment and procedures when dealing with hazards associated with auto body work
    • 7.3 control hazardous products used by auto body technicians
    • 7.4 describe environmental hazards associated with the trade
    • 7.5 use supplied air breathing systems

  • 8. follow work practices that adhere to the regulations of the auto body trade
    • 8.1 apply workplace health and safety regulations
    • 8.2 apply OHS regulations
    • 8.3 apply WHMIS regulations
    • 8.4 apply fire regulations
    • 8.5 apply WCB regulations
    • 8.6 apply environmental regulations including volatile organic compounds (VOC) legislation

  • 9. demonstrate basic competencies
    • 9.1 demonstrate fundamental skills to:
      • 9.1.1 communicate
      • 9.1.2 manage information
      • 9.1.3 use numbers
      • 9.1.4 think and solve problems
    • 9.2 demonstrate personal management skills to:
      • 9.2.1 demonstrate positive attitudes and behaviours
      • 9.2.2 be responsible
      • 9.2.3 be adaptable
      • 9.2.4 learn continuously
      • 9.2.5 work safely
    • 9.3 demonstrate teamwork skills to:
      • 9.3.1 work with others
      • 9.3.2 participate in projects and tasks

  • 10. create a transitional strategy to accommodate personal changes and build personal values
    • 10.1 identify short-term and long-term goals
    • 10.2 identify steps to achieve goals
 





Resources to support: